Vitamin C — A Game Changer in Treatment of Deadly Sepsis


By Dr. Mercola Each year, an estimated 1 million Americans get sepsis1,2 and up to half of them die as a result.3,4,5 Sepsis is a progressive disease process initiated by an aggressive, dysfunctional immune response to an infection in the bloodstream, which is why it’s sometimes referred to as blood poisoning. While illnesses such as bronchitis, pneumonia, strep throat, kidney infection or even localized infections can turn septic, sepsis is most commonly acquired in hospital settings.6,7 Starting out with symptoms of infection, the condition can progress to septic shock, which may be lethal. Unless treated, sepsis can result in extremely low blood pressure that is unresponsive to fluid replacement, weakening of the heart and multiple-organ failure. Unfortunately, treatment can be a considerable challenge, and is becoming even more so as drug-resistant infections become more prevalent. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, sepsis is the most expensive condition
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/07/10/vitamin-c-for-sepsis.aspx

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Is Activated Charcoal Beneficial?


By Dr. Mercola The simple and quick answer to the titled query is a resounding yes, activated charcoal is beneficial. In fact, it might be one of the items to put into your emergency kit. While it might not be used as frequently as vitamin C, you could call it an “essential” item because it could literally save your life. This remedy was one of a few natural medicinals, such as sulfur, doctors have long used for a variety of conditions. It’s not simply charcoal, per se, created by burning wood down to char and produced in the absence of oxygen. To produce activated carbon, aka activated charcoal, it’s treated with oxygen. According to Difference Between: “When charcoal is activated, it is processed in a way to increase the porosity. Because of this, activated carbon will have a large surface area, which can adsorb substances effectively. This primarily increases its effectiveness as a filter. Therefore, activated carbon is mainly used in water filters, in chemical purification process
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/07/10/activated-charcoal.aspx

‘The Fish on My Plate’ — A Global Fish Tale


By Dr. Mercola After having blood drawn on September 21, 2015, as a baseline measure of his health, best-selling author and lifelong fisherman Paul Greenberg undertook what one media source characterized as “‘Super Size Me’ for healthy eaters.”1 For a whole year, as a strict pescatarian, Greenberg ate fish and other seafood daily. All told, he consumed some 700 portions, often eating fish for breakfast, lunch and dinner on the same day. Greenberg’s story is featured in a PBS Frontline documentary, “The Fish on My Plate,”2 which tracks his yearlong journey to identify which fish are the healthiest for human consumption and best for the planet. Along the way, Greenberg successfully draws our attention to a few new options for increasing the sustainability of the global seafood industry. The documentary also features insights and ideas from some of the industry’s top business and thought leaders. As he travels the world, Greenberg crosses paths with the many “ordinary people” who are inv
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/07/08/the-fish-on-my-plate-documentary.aspx

Best Home Remedies for Poison Ivy


By Dr. Mercola Poison ivy, oak and sumac are closely related plants, and may be found growing in similar environments. In fact, all three grow throughout the U.S. except Hawaii, Alaska and parts of Nevada.1 Poison ivy is found throughout the U.S.; poison sumac is distributed mostly on the East Coast from Maine to Florida; and poison oak is found along the West Coast and the south from Texas to Florida and as far north as Illinois.2 While irritating and uncomfortable, poison ivy is not usually dangerous, unless the oil is aerosolized from burning. Inhaling the fumes can trigger an allergic reaction in your lungs. Nearly three quarters of the population of the U.S. will break out into a rash when exposed to the plant leaves. Only 25 percent appear to be resistant to the contact dermatitis that results from exposure to the oil in the plant.3 The rash can be unbearably itchy if left untreated. However, while your primary care physician may want to prescribe a corticosteroid to address the
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/07/08/poison-ivy-home-remedy.aspx

What to Know Before Growing Broccoli


By Dr. Mercola With each satisfying crunch, broccoli delivers great-tasting nutrition and a slew of health-promoting benefits. It is low in calories and rich in vitamins and minerals. Broccoli also contains fiber, which is vital to your digestive health. As one of the cruciferous vegetables, broccoli is a close relative of Brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower. Broccoli has twice the vitamin C of an orange and nearly as much calcium as whole milk, with a better rate of absorption. It’s also a good source of vitamins A and K. It contains several B vitamins, as well as iron, magnesium, potassium, selenium and zinc. Furthermore, broccoli is an excellent source of phytonutrient glucosinolates, flavonoids and other health-boosting antioxidant and anti-cancer compounds. According to Mother Earth News,1 “Broccoli is a nutritional superfood that will strengthen your immune system, help maintain strong bones, and help protect you from cancer and heart disease.” Learn more about why br
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/07/07/growing-broccoli.aspx

Grow Great Cilantro


By Dr. Mercola From 207 B.C. to 220 A.D., China’s Han dynasty used cilantro and coriander in part because they thought it would make them immortal. The herb was used by the Greek and Roman physicians, including Hippocrates, who made medicine from different parts of the plant. Naturally, it was also used as a spice. The fact that it was added to a vinegar used to preserve meat is an indication of its potency. Like other herbs, cilantro’s shiny, scalloped leaves contain its share of potent compounds that give it multiple health benefits. Clinical studies have found it to be antibacterial, antifungal, antiseptic and disinfectant, the most prolific of these being: Antioxidant polyphenolic flavonoids like quercetin, kaempferol, rhamnetin and apigenin Minerals like potassium, iron, calcium, manganese and magnesium Vitamins A, C and K, as well as B vitamins If someone asked you to name the top five most important ingredients in Mexican or Thai cooking, cilantro would probably be on the lis
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Can Sleeping In Decrease Your Waist Size?


By Dr. Mercola About 1 in 3 Americans are getting less than seven hours of sleep a night, and an estimated 83.6 million adults in the U.S. are sleep-deprived.1,2 If you’re trying to lose weight, you may be surprised to know the amount and quality of sleep you get might be as influential as your choice of diet and exercise. Research continues to confirm that sleep is an important factor in helping you avoid diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and obesity. Notably, sleeping in on weekends — a practice quite common among teenagers — may be more beneficial for adults than you may have imagined. In fact, it may not be simply what your body wants, but also precisely what it needs. Weekend ‘Catch Up Sleep’ Shown to Decrease Body Mass Index A study published in the journal Sleep3 involving 2,156 adults aged 19 to 82, indicates sleeping in longer on weekends — also known as “catch up sleep” (CUS) — may positively impact your weight. On average, the group of participa
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/07/06/can-sleeping-in-lower-body-mass-index.aspx

German Chamomile Oil: A Versatile Essential Oil You Should Have at Home


Aside from being famous in teas, the German chamomile plant is also praised for its healing effects in various herbal applications. As a matter of fact, Germans often refer to it as “alles zutraut,” which means “capable of anything.” It’s also been mistakenly referred to as the “European ginseng,” given its cure-all capabilities. But could the same be with German chamomile oil? Read on to learn why you’ll soon want a bottle of this essential oil for you and your family. What Is German Chamomile Oil? German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), which is often referred to as blue chamomile or true chamomile, comes from the Compositae sunflower family. It is one of the two chamomile species that can be used medicinally. The other one is the Roman or English chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). This plant, which hails from Southern and Eastern parts of Europe, grows from 6 centimeters up to 60 centimeters (2.3 to 23.5 inches) tall with heavily branched and furrowed stems. Like Rom
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The Ketogenic Keys to Optimal Health


By Dr. Mercola If you or a loved one has been struggling with low energy, excess weight or a chronic or degenerative disease like type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s or cancer — or if you simply want to optimize your health and longevity — I have great news for you. In an earlier article, I announced that my book, “Fat for Fuel,” would be complemented by an online course on Mitochondrial Metabolic Therapy (MMT) — a collaboration with nutritionist Miriam Kalamian, who specializes in nutritional ketosis. That course is now available, and for a limited time, you’ll receive a $100 discount and over $200 in bonuses, plus free access to a future audio webinar that is currently being put together. I’m proud to say, there’s really nothing else like it out there. The course consists of seven comprehensive lessons to teach you the keys to fighting chronic disease and optimizing your health and longevity. If you or someone you love has cancer, it will also augment any oncological treatment you mi
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